Thoughts on Ancient Philosophy

This is a continuation of the previous blog about Karma as described in Bhagavad Gita. As I have said, Karma really should mean “work: that which is done for energy translation...

Karma in Sanskrit is translated as action or work and commonly associated with external action or work done by living beings more specifically humans. But, action has varied interpretations in various...

Based on the various translations I have done of the sthotrams, mantras, Tantras, Upanishads etc., I find our understanding of Shiva is quite different from what is described in these literatures....

As I have written in Part 1 of the translation of this chapter, the first part of the chapter talks about “the environment and the knowledge of that environment”. The second...

This chapter in Bhagavad Gita is called the Kshetra-Kshetragyana-Yoga. In the standard translations kshetra-kshetragyana is translated as “nature and the enjoyer”. While the actual translation can imply this, it is just...

The Gaudapada Karika is Gaudapada’s comments on the Mandukya Upanishad. Gaudapada argues for Advaita or “non-duality”. Non-duality is a very simple concept¬† and a number of the quantum physicists have commented...

The Bhagavad Gita promotes the “steady atma” through and through. As I have translated in the previous verses in Gita, “If a person becomes quiet from all actions arising out of...

Understanding, is the brain consciously recognizing and being able to recollect information. But, knowing, is where inherently the being knows without having to translate to recognizable words by the external world. ...

All sanskrit texts like the Upanishads, Vedas and so on are pretty huge. The ones I am writing about are just a few among them which have held meaning to me....